Wine Clubs

September 18, 2015

Review of Herzog Limited Edition Lodi Zinfandel 2003, WhistlePig Straight Rye Whiskey and Pig’s Nose Blended Scotch Whisky.

For those who enjoy wine on a regular basis, belonging to a wine club is an excellent way to keep an adequate supply on hand.

Read more>>

More Kosher Zin Please

August 26, 2015

Review of Agua Dulce Zinfandel 2010 and Barrelhound Blended Scotch Whisky.

There is much less by way of kosher “versions” or “editions” for much of the world’s great wine producing regions, including the US.

Read more>>

Meritage For The Summer

August 24, 2015

Reviews of Teperberg Meritage Shomron 2013, Pacifica Evan’s Collection Washington Meritage 2010 and Chivas Regal Extra Blended Scotch Whisky.

It is hot. It is humid. So what should one pair on a summer’s eve with grilled beef, such as a juicy, gloriously fat-marbled, rib-eye steak? There are several options that pair well with grilled meats. Both Zinfandel and Syrah, for example, are considered classic grill food pairings as these tend to showcase bold fruit flavors and with a little spice. We certainly enjoy such varietal wines, and have recommended many here before. At the moment, however, we are thinking more along the lines of a good “meritage” – one that is fruity and hefty, with soft tannins yet is well structured enough to hold its own with the summer menu.

Read more>>

Democracy Of Reviews

August 5, 2015

Hooray for more wine reviewers. But stay away from most “celebrity” stuff.

When it comes to the formal evaluation of wines and spirits, the advent of the internet and the rise of social media have fundamentally altered, to some degree even leveled, and largely democratized the playing field. Now practically anyone with a computer can give voice to their views.

Read more>>

Scotchy, Scotch, Scotch

January 13, 2014

A review of the Yarden Gewurztraminer 2012 and the Ron Burgundy Blended Scotch Whisky, “Great Odin’s Raven” Special Reserve.

Choosing a wine for your meal is dependent upon numerous factors including flavors, style, budget and accompanying foods. An often overlooked factor that can influence one’s selection is the time of day. For example, few would consider sipping a California Cab in the morning — unless attending a wine industry tasting even — but many folks have indulged in a mimosa (or Bloody Mary) to help wash down a brunch. And pairing a quality Champagne with a simply prepared egg dish for breakfast is one of life’s more decadent pleasures.

Read more>>

Johnnie Walker Platinum – Unsurprisingly Good

October 29, 2013

Reviews of the Terrenal Tempranillo 2010 and the new Johnnie Walker Platinum Blended Scotch Whisky.

During the past several years, kosher wines have received numerous accolades and have garnered praise from prominent wine critics and publications. But those who need further proof that kosher wines are firmly part of the mainstream wine world need look no further than their local Trader Joe’s specialty grocery stores. Kosher-anything at Trader Joe’s is regional (they have locations in 30 states), and not all regions carry the same products or even carry wine. For those that do, look for their kosher wine exclusives (for those that don’t, talk to the store manager). Trader Joe’s features some might tasty kosher wines and at mighty fine bang for your buck.

Read more>>

Of Booze And Bores

August 26, 2013

A review of the Bartenura Moscato and Cutty Sark Blended Scotch Whisky.

Wine is much too important to be taken too seriously. Wine is simply a beverage of refreshment. Little more than a wonderfully natural, and alcoholic, way to quench one’s thirst and enliven things a bit, and it has been since ancient times. Yet wine also lends itself to enthusiasm, and so to fixation. In his introduction to Kingsley Amis’ Everyday Drinking, the late Christopher Hitchens noted the “fact” that alcohol “makes other people, and indeed life itself, a good deal less boring.” This in no way means “that there are not wine bores, single-malt bores, and people who become even more boring when they themselves have a tipple.” Too true. Alas.

Read more>>

On Balance And Blends

August 20, 2013

The importance of balance in wine with reviews of the Yarden Sauvignon Blanc 2011 and two blended Scotch whiskies; Johnnie Walker Black and Whilte Horse.

One of the most widely sought after descriptions from the mouth, or pen, of a wine critic is the term “balanced.” The term is meant to convey a harmonious interplay between the different components in a wine, including tannins, alcohol, sweetness and acidity. Should any one of these components stand out from the others, that wine would be deemed out of balance, and so in some measure lacking or less than the ideal. Of particular importance in a balanced wine, especially one whose flavors are especially pronounced, are those elements that provide a counterpoint. So for example, fruity or tannic wines are thought to need an acidic balancing counterpoint, to bring the wine together. In the case of a dessert wine, such as a sauterne, acidity is desired to check the wine’s sweetness so that it does not become boringly unctuous like a jam or jelly. Likewise too much acidity would render a wine tart and unappealing. A wine with ideal acidity keeps these other elements in check, and is perceived as cleansing, refreshing and encouraging of another sip. Any wine that does not encourage the imbiber to take another sip, is probably not enjoyable enough to drink anyway.

Read more>>

Neo-Prohibitionists: Hands Off Our Hooch

August 12, 2013

More governmental efforts to restrict access to our favorite spirits, wine and beer by blocking privatization.

We have written in the past about the byzantine-seeming regulatory patchwork of alcohol laws in this country. Every so often, folks seek to change this regulatory system in the name of freedom and consumer choice, and while progress of a sort has been made in this or that locale, there remains a very long way to go. Even though Prohibition ended with the passage of the 21st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution on Dec. 5, 1933, more than a dozen states today still maintain monopoly control over the sale and/or distribution of distilled spirits — and some still over beer and wine. Most states do not do so, and the idea that monopoly control of some aspect of booze is justifiably a core function of government is silly. Worse, however, is that they further limit product choice, increase costs and generally annoy us consumers.

Read more>>

Older Articles »

Website Lillicotch.com - Powered by WordPress
Thumbnail Screenshots by Thumbshots