Chanukah Wish List

December 22, 2014

Our annual Chanukah gift wish list

Our annual Chanukah gift guide begins with a simple but essential accessory for any wine lover, a corkscrew.

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What Wines Did King David Drink?

October 28, 2014

Reviews of Shiloh Legend II 2010 and several Speyburn Single Malt Scotch Whiskies.

Although the biblical texts are replete with references to wine, the exact varietals employed to create these libations remain a mystery. From the seventh century Islamic conquest of the region until the rebirth of the modern Israeli wine industry in the late 1800s, wine production in Israel was essentially dormant. Consequently, the indigenous wine grape varietals were largely lost. Currently, the grape varietals being widely grown in Israel are mostly European imports, including such familiar names as Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Riesling, Chardonnay and Syrah.

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Crime In A Bottle

March 24, 2014

A review of the Recanati Shiraz 2011 and 2 Speyburn Single Malt Scotch Whiskies.

Not long ago, the wine world was rocked by crime. Not anything, we hasten to add, as silly as red wine with fish (especially since that actually works in many cases). Rather we are referring to several high profile cases that illustrate that when something of value is created, like a great bottle of wine, there are some unscrupulous folks that see an opportunity for larceny.

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Between Red And White

July 11, 2013

A review of the Agur Rosa 2012 and 2 Speyburn Single Malt Scotch Whiskies.

Rosé wines have become increasingly popular. The best embody the brightness of a white wine combined with the complexity usually only found in a red. They range in style from light and bone-dry to fruity and fuller-bodied. Well-crafted rosés are very food-friendly, particularly the graceful lighter ones that match perfectly with such summer fare as salads, grilled fish and the more subtle cheeses. Rosés are most often created by allowing the pressed juice to have only minimal contact with the skins, usually only one to three days. The longer the contact between the juice and the skins, the deeper the color. Another method is known as “saignee” (French for bleeding). Saignee is the term used for when a winemaker, in their endeavor to produce greater intensity in their red wines, will bleed off only a small portion of the (red grape) juice from the crushed grape skins, while the remaining juice stays in contact with the skins. By bleeding off some of this juice from the vat, there will be a greater surface area ratio of skins to juice in the vat, so that more color and possibly even complexity can be extracted from the skins into their future red wine. The lighter juice that was bled off, can then be turned into rosé.

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